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National Science Week

National Science Week Science Week Making science fun 15-23 August 2015 To be perfectly honest with you, when I was a kid in primary school, science was not really my thing. Yes I would have rather had my nose in a book, or writing another story in my exercise book (no surprises there!). It just wasn’t fun. In high school...
Science Week

Making science fun

15-23 August 2015

To be perfectly honest with you, when I was a kid in primary school, science was not really my thing. Yes I would have rather had my nose in a book, or writing another story in my exercise book (no surprises there!). It just wasn’t fun. In high school things got a little more interesting when they got divided into three separate subjects of Chemistry, Physics and Biology and you could opt to do one or the other, but it still wasn’t… fun. It was dry and icky (dissecting frogs anyone?) and just sort of boring. Or maybe that was just me???

Needless to say, a lot has changed since I was a kid!

And, thankfully, all for the better.

Involving kids in science, and really, the magic of the world around them, is high on the agenda during National Science Week, currently on across Australia.

The schools theme for National Science Week, held currently between 15 and 23 August, is Making Waves The Science of Light, based on the International Year of Light.

So what is National Science Week and who is it for?

Described as “Australia’s annual celebration of science and technology and thousands of individuals – from students, to scientists to chefs and musicians – get involved, taking part in more than 1000 science events across Australia, Science Week is for everyone – not just schools and universities – with events and activities and talks and shows for every age group.”

It provides an opportunity to acknowledge the contributions of Australian scientists’ to the world of knowledge. It also aims to encourage an interest in science pursuits among the general public, and to encourage younger people to become fascinated by the world we live in.

So how can your school get involved?

Some handy tips from the National Science Week website include:

Get involved! Go to a National Science Week event. Around 1000 events take place around Australia during National Science Week each year, with universities, schools, museums and science centres getting involved.

Are you a Teacher? Use the ASTA Teacher Resource Book.

For National Science Week each year, ASTA produces a teacher resource book to help support and assist teachers in providing engaging science activities for their students. The book is based, each year, on the National Science Week school theme chosen for that year and is always packed with information, classroom activities, experiments, diagrams, photographs and websites.

For the latest info visit the National Science Week Website and sign up to the newsletter for updates and follow on Twitter and Facebook.

Have you heard of the Stephanie Alexander Kitchen Foundation?

Stephanie Alexander AO is an Australian cook, restaurateur and food writer who has published many gorgeous cookbooks. She is a self-described “champion of the quality and diversity of Australian food” and started her Kitchen Garden program for kids back in 2001. According to the Kitchen Garden Foundation website, now “in 835 schools Australia-wide, around 100,000 children are enthusiastically getting their hands dirty and learning how to grow, harvest, prepare and share fresh, seasonal food as part of the Stephanie Alexander Kitchen Garden Program”.

This week, in honour of Science Week, The Stephanie Alexander Kitchen Garden Foundation has put together a lesson plan for kids on how bread rises. In this activity, children use scientific methods of experimentation to test the three different rising agents and record their results.

This is also a great one to try with the kiddies at home! For more info click here.

Is your school celebrating Science Week? Let us know what fun activities you have planned!

As always, if too much Harley is never enough, you can find us on Instagram (where you will be showered with love, special offers and gifts so don't miss out!), Facebook, Twitter, Youtube and Pinterest too.

Thanks for stopping by, see you again soon.

Jess x

Science Week

Making science fun

15-23 August 2015

To be perfectly honest with you, when I was a kid in primary school, science was not really my thing. Yes I would have rather had my nose in a book, or writing another story in my exercise book (no surprises there!). It just wasn’t fun. In high school things got a little more interesting when they got divided into three separate subjects of Chemistry, Physics and Biology and you could opt to do one or the other, but it still wasn’t… fun. It was dry and icky (dissecting frogs anyone?) and just sort of boring. Or maybe that was just me???

Needless to say, a lot has changed since I was a kid!

And, thankfully, all for the better.

Involving kids in science, and really, the magic of the world around them, is high on the agenda during National Science Week, currently on across Australia.

The schools theme for National Science Week, held currently between 15 and 23 August, is Making Waves The Science of Light, based on the International Year of Light.

So what is National Science Week and who is it for?

Described as “Australia’s annual celebration of science and technology and thousands of individuals – from students, to scientists to chefs and musicians – get involved, taking part in more than 1000 science events across Australia, Science Week is for everyone – not just schools and universities – with events and activities and talks and shows for every age group.”

It provides an opportunity to acknowledge the contributions of Australian scientists’ to the world of knowledge. It also aims to encourage an interest in science pursuits among the general public, and to encourage younger people to become fascinated by the world we live in.

So how can your school get involved?

Some handy tips from the National Science Week website include:

Get involved! Go to a National Science Week event. Around 1000 events take place around Australia during National Science Week each year, with universities, schools, museums and science centres getting involved.

Are you a Teacher? Use the ASTA Teacher Resource Book.

For National Science Week each year, ASTA produces a teacher resource book to help support and assist teachers in providing engaging science activities for their students. The book is based, each year, on the National Science Week school theme chosen for that year and is always packed with information, classroom activities, experiments, diagrams, photographs and websites.

For the latest info visit the National Science Week Website and sign up to the newsletter for updates and follow on Twitter and Facebook.

Have you heard of the Stephanie Alexander Kitchen Foundation?

Stephanie Alexander AO is an Australian cook, restaurateur and food writer who has published many gorgeous cookbooks. She is a self-described “champion of the quality and diversity of Australian food” and started her Kitchen Garden program for kids back in 2001. According to the Kitchen Garden Foundation website, now “in 835 schools Australia-wide, around 100,000 children are enthusiastically getting their hands dirty and learning how to grow, harvest, prepare and share fresh, seasonal food as part of the Stephanie Alexander Kitchen Garden Program”.

This week, in honour of Science Week, The Stephanie Alexander Kitchen Garden Foundation has put together a lesson plan for kids on how bread rises. In this activity, children use scientific methods of experimentation to test the three different rising agents and record their results.

This is also a great one to try with the kiddies at home! For more info click here.

Is your school celebrating Science Week? Let us know what fun activities you have planned!

As always, if too much Harley is never enough, you can find us on Instagram (where you will be showered with love, special offers and gifts so don't miss out!), Facebook, Twitter, Youtube and Pinterest too.

Thanks for stopping by, see you again soon.

Jess x

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